Creating Campus Change Studies

logo-c-2The Creating Campus Change studies have two components.

  • One study seeks to define a overall epidemiological impact of  of alcohol and drug use at participating colleges. It is by getting an accurate picture of what is happening at each college that they can accurately address the issues at each college.
  • The second study seeks to explore the efficacy of using the Brief Alcohol Intervention for College Students with Tribal College and University Students. BASICS has been used and adopted widely at many large mainstream universities with great success. With our BASICS TCU partners we want to offer an adaptation of this intervention to TCU campuses.

 

 

 


 

TCU: Behavioral Wellness Epidemiology Study

Lead Investigator: Bonnie Duran, Dr.PH

Academic achievement is important for American Indian/Alaskan Native (AIAN) individuals for professional and personal reasons. An AIAN individual without a college degree is ten times more likely to develop alcohol dependence than an AIAN with a college degree. Research also suggests that alcohol abuse among young AIAN individuals reduces the likelihood of pursuing and completing higher education goals.
This Epidemiology study aims to collect data at tribal colleges and universities to assist in developing AIAN specific interventions and policies that address alcohol and drug use on TCU campuses.

Long-Term Goal

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects to enhance academic achievement by eliminating drug and alcohol abuse related problems and health disparities for AIAN individuals attending TCUs.

Specific Aims

  • Survey a national representative sample of 1200 students at up to 32 TCU and apply a Native-specific, strength- and resiliency-based model to examine how AIAN-specific risk and protective health behaviors influence substance abuse and mental health outcomes.
  • Examine risk and resiliency factors for historical trauma and other violence exposure and meanings of stressors in local TCU context.
  • Disseminate study findings broadly and work to eliminate health disparities by translating the findings into policy and practice guidelines for TCU leaders, allies and funders.

Rationale

This is a major step toward developing culturally appropriate and sustainable interventions at TCU that address substance abuse.

Approach

The Center for Indigenous Health Research will work in collaboration with the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), up to 32 partnering TCU, a Scientific and Community Advisory Committee, and three research groups from the University of Washington (UW).
A CBPR approach and principles of mutual respect and equity will be followed.

Benefits to TCUs

  • Return of all data collected on substance abuse, mental health, risk behaviors and protective factors in TCU communities in complete, aggregated data sets to each TCU for use in policy, grant writing and future development projects.
  • Provision of data about resiliency and health promotion factors in TCU culture at the individual, group and community levels.
  • Increase of bidirectional re-search capacity between TCU and UW.
  • Informing and improving health services referrals.

Study Fact Sheet

Download (PDF, 560KB)


TCU: Behavioral Wellness (TCU-BeWell) BASICS Intervention Adaptation

Lead Investigator: Bonnie Duran, Dr.PH

Academic achievement is important for American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) individuals for professional and personal reasons. An AIAN individual without a college degree is ten times more likely to develop alcohol dependence than an AIAN with a college degree. Alcohol abuse among young AIAN individuals reduces the likelihood of pursuing and completing higher education goals. These findings and others from our current partnership with Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCU) have led to the present application to use a Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach to implement alcohol prevention services and improve treatment services for TCU students.

The Tribal College Student Situation

An important aspect of TCU is that they are able to provide personalized attention to their students in order to overcome the economic and social barriers they face in the educational process. Our current survey includes 26 TCU which represent institutions where 90% of all TCU students are enrolled. Our preliminary findings suggest that Colleges are ready and able to conduct alcohol prevention services, and eager to improve the interface with treatment services provided locally. There is a strong sense of community (or “Social Capital”) at TCU, and students, faculty and staff will work together to improve prevention and treatment outcomes. This strong sense of community might influence drinking norms. The majority of TCU students believe that most or all of the time students drink, they intend to get drunk. On one hand, although the perception among students is that binge drinking is the norm, 50% state they DO NOT feel comfortable seeking behavioral health services. On the other hand, an overwhelming number of faculty and staff –approximately 85%– would feel comfortable identifying students in need and referring students for services, and nearly 60% have done so in the past.

Project Goals

The vision of this research is to increase academic achievement and reduce alcohol-related health disparities for AIAN peoples.

  • This will be accomplished by using the CBPR partnership to adapt and test the highly successful, Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) for use at TCU.
  • The partnership will also develop a policy, institutional intervention to help implement BASICS, and to integrate the TCU with local Indian Health Service/Tribal/Urban behavioral health systems.

What is BASICS?

Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) is a successful low-cost brief intervention that uses personalized feedback and motivational interviewing to promote healthy choices.

Benefits to TCUs

  • Adaptation of a successful brief intervention for six TCU sites
  • Up to $15,000 to six participating TCU for development of a research team
  • Staff/faculty/student training to provide BASICS in-person brief feedback
  • Coaching team to help integrate services for TCU and implementation of BASICS

Study Fact Sheet

Download (PDF, 144KB)

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